Bucharest
Neighborhood Tours

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Our most recommended Bucharest Neighborhood Tours

Bucharest: 3-Hour Walking Tour

1. Bucharest: 3-Hour Walking Tour

If all the world’s a stage, then, for sure, Bucharest deserves its place in the spotlight! It has experienced it all: love, betrayal, Russian tzars, French Vaudeville, merchants of Venetian goods, Greek tragedies, and one or two great fires for good measure. Experience some of the most important sights in Bucharest and learn the stories behind them as you explore Romania’s capital on foot, alongside a local guide with insider knowledge of the city. Your Bucharest tour starts in the political center of the city, Revolution Square. Formerly known as Palace Square, this iconic spot has witnessed some of the most important events in Romanian history. It was from here in 1989 that dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu made his rallying speech to a crowd that quickly turned on him, instigating the Romanian revolution. This is also where you’ll discover several other notable landmarks, including the former Royal Palace, the beautiful Romanian Athenaeum (the city’s main concert hall) and the Athenee Palace Hilton (built in 1914 and formerly a favorite hangout for spies). Leaving the square, head filled with fascinating facts, you’ll go south along Victory Avenue, which was named for the victory of the new Romanian nation in the 1877 War of Independence. Soak up the history and significance of the street, we’ll also be passing by — and getting the stories behind — some other important buildings, including several palaces, museums and the beautiful Kretzulescu Church, one of the most famous churches in Bucharest. Next, explore the many sights of Bucharest’s Old Town. This is the heart of medieval Bucharest, the literal crossroads between East and West, where Ottoman pashas rubbed shoulders with Transylvanian princes. The winding, cobbled streets are filled with bars, cafés, shops and restaurants much-loved by locals and visitors alike. But if you need a dose of peace and quiet, you can find it in the calming courtyard of Stavropoleos Monastery, or the great wooden inn of Hanul Lui Manuc, which offers a captivating glimpse into an earlier time. Along the way, we’ll visit one of the most beautiful bookstores in the world, the stunning Carturesti Carusel and snack on traditional covrig (basically a soft pretzel), one of the most popular street foods in Romania. We will finish the tour in front of the ruins of the Old Princely Court, which dates to the 15th century. This is the former residence of one of the most famous individuals in history: Vlad Tepes, the inspiration for Dracula.

Bucharest: Half Day Bike Tour

2. Bucharest: Half Day Bike Tour

Start your 4-hour bike tour in Bucharest’s old city, where you’ll hear about the birth of the city and Romanian civilization. During Communist times the old city area was decimated and overtaken by grandiose urban projects. Today it is one of the poorest areas in Bucharest and is mostly inhabited by gypsies. Marvel at the monumental Parliament Palace, and learn about life for the people under the Ceasescu regime. Ride by buildings dating from the golden age of Bucharest of the 19th and the early 20th century. See landmarks and monuments from the time when Bucharest was known as Little Paris.

Bucharest: Hidden Gems 3-Hour Walking Tour

3. Bucharest: Hidden Gems 3-Hour Walking Tour

We will start our tour with a gentle stroll to one of the most well-known mahalas (neighborhoods) in the city, Batistei. Mahalas usually rose up around a religious building and were inhabited by groups of people from the same ethnic, social, or religious groups. As the city grew, so did these areas, suffering through waves of modernization, earthquakes, wars, and Nicolae Ceausescu's numerous demolition projects. Batistei is still a vibrant and exciting neighborhood to explore; visit the 18th-century stone church, listed as a historic monument by Romania’s Ministry of Culture and Religious Affairs and hear stories about what it was like to live here before the Communist regime took over. The Armenian neighborhood houses one of the best preserved Orthodox churches in the city and that is where we will head next. Built in the early 20th century for the once burgeoning (now diminishing) Armenian population, the church is an exact replica of a cathedral in the Armenian city of Ecmiazin. Next on the agenda is the city’s oldest home, a fascinating example of a traditional Wallachian peasant house with its high cellar and glass-covered veranda. Casa Melik, as it is known, hides a mass of secrets including a striking art collection. Legend has it that a series of underground tunnels connect the house with local masonic lodges. Snack time! We will make a pit stop to try one of Romania’s favorite historic street food snacks, the covrig. It was originally thought that Greek merchants introduced covrig, a salty snack similar to a pretzel, in the 19th century to encourage increased consumption of their wine, but it’s remarkable similarity to German pretzels, suggests Romanians may have been eating these long before that. Our next stop is one of the prettiest areas in Bucharest: Mantuleasa street. It was originally a mahala for rich merchants. Elegant architecture can be found here that combines neoclassical, Romanian, and modernist styles. This was also Mircea Eliade’s favorite part of the city. Here we will stop to learn more about the life and work of Romania’s most revered writer and philosopher, who was a professor at the University of Chicago until his death in 1986. Your tour ends with a visit to the breathtakingly beautiful Ioanid block and Icoanei mahalla but be sure to ask your local guides for tips on where else to visit in beautiful Bucharest and where the best places to eat and drink can be found.  

Bucharest: Street Food Tour with a Local Guide

4. Bucharest: Street Food Tour with a Local Guide

Discover the best of Bucharest's gastronomy on this all-encompassing food tour. Start your tour with "the snack of communism", a Romanian pretzel and yogurt, the breakfast of choice for communist workers.  Afterward, take a short tram ride to reach Obor Market, one of Romania's largest and oldest markets, this is the best place to discover Romanian food and culture. During your tram journey, admire the architecture and buildings of the Jewish and Armenian quarters of the city. At the market, enjoy a stroll through stalls selling everything from honey and cheese to handcrafted wooden bowls and fresh produce. Visit a well-known stall to sample some traditional Romanian ground meat rolls, washed down with a cool beer. After this experience, take the trolleybus to University Square. As you walk, learn about the most important historical landmarks located between University Square and Cismigiu Park. Finish your tour at a fine dining restaurant where you can taste sweet Wallachian doughnuts called Papanasi, served hot and filled with jam and delicious cream. While indulging, feel free to ask your friendly local guide for tips on what else to eat and see during your stay in Bucharest.

Bucharest: Sites & Bites Tour with a Local Guide

5. Bucharest: Sites & Bites Tour with a Local Guide

Your Bucharest tour begins in the political center of the city, Revolution Square (formerly known as Palace Square), which has witnessed most of the important events in Romanian history. It was from here in 1989 that dictator Ceausescu made his ill-advised rallying speech to a crowd that quickly turned on him, instigating the Romanian revolution. Surrounding the square are several other notable landmarks, including the former Royal Palace, the Athenaeum concert hall, and Athenee Palace, the heart of espionage and intrigue in the years between the wars. And in such a historical spot, it’s appropriate that you have a historical treat. You’ll indulge in a covrig, a daily salty snack for most Romanians that was likely introduced by Hapsburg or German merchants in medieval times.  Next up, you’ll leave the square and head south along Victory Street, named after the spectacular victory of the new Romanian nation in the 1871 War of Independence. However, full unification of the three Romanian principalities did not take place until 1918, which explains why each region has its own distinct character, traditions, and cuisine — like sweet for Moldova, earthy for Transylvania, and spicy for Muntenia. This stretch is also home to many spectacular landmarks of the inter-war period, including the 'Telephone Palace,' Military Circle, and former National Theatre, as well as the beautiful church of Kretzulescu, one of the most famous in Bucharest.  From Victory Street, you’ll head into an older Bucharest, exploring the numerous paths and passageways of the Old Town. This is the heart of medieval Bucharest, the literal crossroads between East and West, where Ottoman pashas rubbed shoulders with Transylvanian princes, and churches and mosques stood side by side. Here you can witness the many diverse influences on Romanian food — the Balkan mici (skinless sausages), the Ottoman sarmale (stuffed cabbage leaves), Russian borscht andciorba (sour soups), and Austro-Hungarian schnitzel. Among the many sights and stories of Old Town are lavish interiors and princely courts, the exquisite calm of an orthodox monastery and the great wooden inn of Hanul Lui Manuc. En route to your final destination, you get a look at the famed People's Palace, the center of Ceausescu’s megalomaniac attempts to re-shape the city, and the second largest building in the world (only the Pentagon is bigger!). Finally, the Bucharest tour will end with a sampling of the culinary specialties at a traditional hanu, or inn, that’s widely considered to be one of the most beautiful in the city. You’ll dig into a three-course meal with platters of local delicacies — giving you a 'taste tour' of the history and geography of the region. It was said that during the time of the ancient Romanians (the Dacians), so much wine was drunk by the people that their leader, Burebista, banned its production entirely. But the supremely inventive Dacians immediately began brewing beer — thus, you’ll have a chance to lubricate your palate with both fine Romanian wines and/or locally brewed beer, just like the Dacians would have wanted!

Wine Tasting Tour of Bucharest Old Town

6. Wine Tasting Tour of Bucharest Old Town

From the meeting point to the wine bar you will have time to admire the streets of Old Town and listen to interesting details about famous old buildings from the guide. The tour starts with a walk through Old Town where you will admire the historical buildings and you will receive detailed information from our guide. After you have crossed the Old Town on foot, you'll stop at the wine bar, where you will taste three types of wine and be served from a mixed platter of cheese. Your guide will talk extensively about local gastronomy, the best wines of Romania and any other gastronomic details you are interested in.

Bucharest: 3-Hour Dark History Tour with a Local

7. Bucharest: 3-Hour Dark History Tour with a Local

Learn the dark history of Bucharest, starting with a visit to the monumental Memorial of the Victims of Communism and of the Resistance, built as a reminder of the cruel events that unfolded between 1950 to 1977. Hear about the torture methods used at the deportation camps during the days of communism. Travel back to the beginning of the 20th century, when Bucharest was known as "Little Paris" for its sexy and sophisticated atmosphere. Stop for a drink inside a former brothel, and hear the story of the serial killer nicknamed the "Vampire of Bucharest" when he terrorized the city between 1970 and 1971. Visit one of the oldest churches in the city to explore the bloody feuds between the Muslim world and the Christian rules of Romania. End at Bellu Cemetery to look at the amazing funerary architecture and learn more about some of the site's mysteries.

Bucharest: Welcome Private Tour with a Local

8. Bucharest: Welcome Private Tour with a Local

Explore the city with a friendly local who is passionate about his/her city and eager to share all the tips and tricks that will help you make the most of your trip. Meet where you're staying to get familiar with the neighborhood, find out about the best places to eat and buy groceries, the easiest ways to get around and the hidden gems you might have missed. By the end of the tour, you'll feel more comfortable in navigating the city and confident that you have all the information you need to make the most of your stay. Once your booking is received, get in touch with you to confirm all the details for the tour: meeting place and time, language and your contact information and also some questions to get to know you better. The right local will be handpicked for you based on your interests. Each tour is completely customized so you can choose the meeting location, starting time and length that you prefer (minimum: 2-hours). During the walking tour, you will have the option of taking public transportation or taxi to get around the city (at your expense). The local guides are locals who are passionate about their city and love to meet travelers and share what they love about their city. They are not professional tour guides and do these tours occasionally, which provides an authentic and personal experience that is like having a friend show you around their home city.  Through conversations with your local guide, learn what it’s like to live in the city, learn about cultural differences, local events and politics and also get to know each other on a personal level. With this experience, you won’t be just passing through the city, you’ll be part of it.

Bohemian Bucharest: Markets & Mahallas Small Group Tour

9. Bohemian Bucharest: Markets & Mahallas Small Group Tour

Your Bucharest tour begins in University Square, the geographical and administrative heart of the city, and the scene of titanic street battles between miners and students immediately after the Romanian Revolution. Absorb all that sociopolitical history before taking a short walk to Strada Batistei, formerly known as the 'St Germain' of Bucharest and the site of the old American embassy, now an overgrown testament to different times. This area is famed for its 19th-century Neo Romanian architecture that defines much of the national style.  The first stop will be an exquisite turn-of-the-century townhouse, lovingly restored but with the sense of elegant decay so typical of Bucharest.  Under trees and vines, with grapes dangling overhead, you’ll sample a selection of Romanian entrees (gustari), including goat cheese, cured meat, spring onions, homemade bread, and locally brewed craft beers, and you can relax and absorb the atmosphere of this recherché little hideaway. It is said that while Romanians love the culture and sophistication of urban life, when it comes to food their taste is always for the peasant food (cucina povera) of the countryside, so this peasant platter will be the perfect introduction to Romanian flavours.    To help you digest all those treats, you then make your way to the Armenian quarter. The Armenians were a vibrant and successful merchant community in the 18th and 19th centuries, thanks to their valuable role as 'middlemen' for the Ottomans. Based around the Armenian church, their mahalla (neighborhood) features a spectacular variety of architectural styles from all over Europe and the Ottoman empire, as the wealthy merchants strove to out-do each other in taste and elegance. Classical, Belle Époque, Modernist, New-Romanian, Balkanic, eclectic — this quarter boasts all these styles, including the oldest documented house in Bucharest, which you will visit.   Crossing into the old Jewish quarter, stop for the most famous street-food, covrigi, before heading on further on your Bucharest tour to discover one of the most beautiful and peaceful areas of the city: Mantuleasa. After exploring 19th-century and inter-war Bucharest, stop for an ice-cold Romanian weissbier, in a space that can only be described as art-gallery-meets-bookstore-meets-summer garden, before experiencing the quintessential Bucharest public transport: a short ride on a tram. Rattling along the famous Mosilor Street, you’ll enter into Communist Bucharest, with its regimented blocks and housing projects, as you make your way to the famous Obor Market. This market is the largest and most famous of all the peasant markets in Bucharest, offering every kind of item, food, or service you could imagine, and even some that you couldn’t!   Since you’ll be on the trail of the sights, scents, and tastes of Romanian cuisine, stop for a drink of traditional Romanian palinca (brandy) to prepare the palate. Next, enter the indoor market to sample a range of Romanian cheeses: cow, sheep, and goat. After that, it’s on to the vegetable market, amid a riot of colors and textures, to taste and photograph the fresh local produce.   Probably the most famous and typical of Romanian foods — at least for Romanians — is called mici, which translates as 'little.'  A kind of skinless sausage, these are served with mustard and cold beer, and every Romanian has their own opinion about where and how the best ones are made. But certainly the stall in Obor Market has been known for more than 50 years as one of the temples of mici, and here you will get to try them for yourself! And finally, because your gastronomic adventure would not be complete without a dessert, you grab a sweet Wallachian doughnut, served piping hot, before sending you happily on your way home. 

Bucharest: Private Flea Market Tour by Vintage Car

10. Bucharest: Private Flea Market Tour by Vintage Car

Start your day of adventure with a convenient pick-up service at your accommodation in Bucharest. Here, you will meet your driver and hop in your private Dacia 1310, vintage automobile. Hop aboard a true relic of history before setting off on your journey through Bucharest.  Your informative driver/guide will take you to two flea markets and assist you with all your vintage and antique shopping.  You will also get the chance, in your vintage vehicle, to see Bucharest the way a local sees it, with a tour through the city streets of this fascinating city. As you drive, your informative guides will point out particular points of interest along the way, like the Parliament house, amongst others.  In the flea markets, you can prepare to find an abundance of weird and wonderful things, from plates to teapots to magazines to dolls, stamps, books, bags, military coats, from watches to jewelry or from toys to furniture. Your guides can assist you in trying to find what you're after, and can even help with negotiating a price.  Once you have done perusing and sightseeing for the day, you will end the day with a drive back to your accommodation in the Dacia, ready for an evening of rest after a day of adventure. 

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What people are saying about Bucharest

Overall rating

4.5 / 5

based on 25 reviews

Great tour of the cemetery with extras about the revolution and local history. Andra is very well read and knowledgeable. You will learn a lot of interesting things on this tour! The only thing I would suggest is to offer the free water at the begging of the tour rather than at the end. Local snack was also offered which was really nice.

Our tour guide Șerban RIGA was so hospitable and he took as to nice local places, the kabab we ate at the market was surly the best ever. His English is very fluent and high level. we had good vibe and laughed during our time.

This is an excellent way to see around Bucharest. Our guide, Alex, was charming and wonderful - we learned so much about Romania's history and he was constantly attentive to our group. Very highly recommended!

Good, knowledgeable guide. Made the best of bad weather. Learnt lots of history and culture.

fun tour, really liked the food market. our guide was wonderful.