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Kyoto

Cooking classes

Our most recommended Kyoto Cooking Classes

Kyoto: 45-Minute Tea Ceremony Experience

1. Kyoto: 45-Minute Tea Ceremony Experience

You will take you place on the tatami, the traditional Japanese floor mat and be met by your English-speaking host, who is a licensed tea master from Urasenke, the biggest school of tea ceremony in Japan. Watch as the host carries out the ceremonial preparation of matcha, powdered green tea. Then, you will have the chance to make tea yourself, while the host informs you about the history and spiritual role of the tea ceremony and the effects each tea-making method has on its flavor. Afterwards, savor some traditional Japanese sweets Once the ceremony has come to a close, you will have the chance to take photos and see examples of kimonos and beautiful woven textiles made in the Nishijin district of Kyoto. If you'd like to wear a kimono during the experience, you can select it as an add-on during booking and take photos to remember the experience.

Kyoto: Morning Japanese Bento Cooking Class

2. Kyoto: Morning Japanese Bento Cooking Class

Experience an authentic Japanese food tradition and prepare your own bento box at a morning bento cooking class in Kyoto. Learn about typical Japanese dishes, such as sushi, tempura and miso soup, and hear about the cultural background of the well-known Japanese "bento" takeaway meal. Traced back to the late Kamakura Period (1185 to 1333), the bento box has now become a staple of Japanese cuisine. Arrive for your 2.5 to 3-hour class and collect your ingredients, apron and utensils. Then, watch and follow your chef as they demonstrate the art of bento and explain the tricks to making beautiful Japanese dishes often found in a bento box. Once you have finished cooking your dishes, enjoy the fruits of your labor and tuck into your bento lunch.

Kyoto: Afternoon Japanese Izakaya Cooking Class

3. Kyoto: Afternoon Japanese Izakaya Cooking Class

Join an afternoon Izakaya cooking class to enjoy a great way to immerse yourself in Japanese dining culture as well as learn authentic Japanese foods that are eaten at home and in local restaurants. The cooking course consists of two parts. First, you will cook 2 or 3 dishes together with your chef and enjoy them. Then you will return to the kitchen and learn 2 or 3 more dishes before eating once more. As in many Izakaya (over the counter) restaurants, be ready to talk with your chef while cooking and eating at the same time. 

Kyoto: Authentic Japanese Art Sushi Roll Lesson

4. Kyoto: Authentic Japanese Art Sushi Roll Lesson

Make sushi rolls that look like a beautiful flower during this fun and crafty lesson with local experts. Made using rice vinegar, sugar, sesame, ginger, vegetables, and nori (seaweed), you will learn about the essential history and trivia of sushi rolls. Wear a beautiful komono and enjoy fresh Japanese tea and water during the class. Japanese sushi rolls were first created between 1750 and 1776 during the Edo period (1603-1868) when the popular culture blossomed. At that time, sushi made using sake and vinegar spread and a wide variety of foods became popular. In the early 1800s, sushi that could be made quickly using vinegar became mainstream. In the Showa period, sushi rolls began to made in a more complicated pattern. Using special recipes and ingredients, you will acquire the skills to continue making beautiful sushi rolls at home.

Nishiki Market Food Tour with Cooking Class

5. Nishiki Market Food Tour with Cooking Class

Explore Nishiki Market with your local Japanese guide, followed by a cooking class. It only takes 15 minutes to walk through this historical food market if you do not have anyone to explain about its history, custom and foods, but if you have someone who is knowledgeable about the market, you can easily spend hours. You can ask question about the foods you may not have seen before to your guides, and even to some shop staff to who your guide will help translate.  What is more unique about this private tour is that you can cook your own donburi (bowl) meal by the ingredients you just bought in the tour. Ingredients cost is included in the tour. You can choose from three options; Kaisen-don (seafood), Ten-don (tempura) or Oyako-don (chicken & egg).  The tour starts from the Nishiki Market Western entrance. You will be briefed about the tour then you will start the tour. Typically you should spend about 1 hour in the Nishiki Market and later you cook and eat your own donburi in 1 hour.  Tour tour is private so you can ask as many questions as you may have, and the tour moves at your pace.

Kyoto: Private Tea Ceremony with Japanese Tea & Sweets

6. Kyoto: Private Tea Ceremony with Japanese Tea & Sweets

This activity includes two kinds of powdered green tea (thick tea and light tea), fresh sweets and dried traditional sweets. All are made by shops of long standing in Kyoto. Especially, Japanese fresh sweets are really artistic. Hear the beautiful name of the sweets which reflects seasons in Japan. Thick tea is typical in tea ceremony, rare to see in Japanese cafes. The way of tea is a little different from the light one. It’s more elegant and rare to see also. But if you would like a host to make light tea instead of thick tea, it's possible. Also, learn about the history of Japanese flower arrangement and the difference between western arranging. You can take photos for free. It is recommended to keep tranquil atmosphere during the way of tea, but if you would like to take photos, it’s up to you because it’s private session. Also in the next waiting room, you can take photos with kimono or Nishijin textiles before or after the tea ceremony experience. All explanation is given in fluent English by a lecturer of Urasenke, one of the biggest tea schools in Japan. You can make good light tea of good quality at home after taking this class. If you have problem with your legs or hard to sit on tatami, please use little chairs suit to tatami room for free. Do you want to wear a Kimono? Wear a kimono (traditional cloth in Japan) during the tea ceremony and take photos to remember the experience. 

Frequently asked questions about Kyoto Cooking Classes

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Other Sightseeing Options in Kyoto

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What people are saying about Kyoto

Overall rating

4.7 / 5

based on 268 reviews

Nice and beautiful place, very close to Kyoto's famous golden temple Kinkakuji temple... Guide/tea host was very knowledgeable, introducing tea ceremony in well spoken English, yet did not reduce the original Japanese ambience... We rented the kimono, and it was soooooo beautiful 100% i would recommend this one to other visitors expecting local experience (E&C-Indonesia)

very nice cooking class with a perfect english speaking teacher. all meals were very very delicious, the best food we ate in japan yet. if you don't like any of the ingredients, you can choose an alternative. also got insider tips from our teacher, thanks for that! :) we highly recommend this class if you are staying in kyoto or the area around.

I did the tea ceremony and it was a really lovely experience! The instructed was super friendly and very experienced in the tea ceremony so it was interesting to learn more about it from her!

The experience was excellent! it was amazing to experience some traditional Japanese culture, it was very tranquil, and the tea was delicious!

Amazing experience. We learned so much about japanese cooking that we will bring home with us.