Things to do in
Scheunenviertel

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Our most recommended things to do in Scheunenviertel

Berlin: Courtyards Private 2-Hour Tour

1. Berlin: Courtyards Private 2-Hour Tour

Explore the Hackesche Höfe and learn more about the unusual fate of this revitalized district and its incredible history. Immerse yourself in the colorful multicultural life on Sophienstraße and take a look into the courtyard of the artisan association as well as the interesting Sophie-Gips-Höfe. Große Hamburger Straße has always been a “road of tolerance”. Look behind the scenes of a great Catholic institution, enjoy the views of the most important Baroque church in the city, and learn more about the fate of the Jewish community in Berlin and its first cemetery. On the famous Oranienburger Straße you can learn more about the history of the imposing New Synagogue and the adjacent Postfuhramt. At the end of the tour you will have the opportunity to look into the Heckmann Höfe, one of the most interesting back courtyards of the neighborhood.

Berlin: History of Crime Walking Tour

2. Berlin: History of Crime Walking Tour

Dive into the underbelly of Berlin's past as you discover its history of crime on this walking tour. Delve into stories about gangs, political murders, and facinating scandals.   Hear about how Chicago gangs dominated the Berlin entertainment industry in the 1920s. Get details on the underworld's involvement in protection rackets, drug trafficking, kidnappings and prostitution. Learn about how the infamous Glasgow gang terrified the whole of Berlin in the post-war period and hear about the Safe Breakers. Listen as your guide tells you the story behind the gang fight at the Silesian train station. Immerse yourself in the terror at Bülowplatz where the later head of the Ministry for State Security, Erich Mielke, was involved in a political murder. See the former location of the massive Berlin police headquarters and find out how the police won world acclaim through Ernst Gennat.  Finish your tour at the Rotes Rathaus where you can hear the tale of a financial scandal in the 1920s which involved the mayor. 

Berlin: Private Guided E-Rickshaw Tour

3. Berlin: Private Guided E-Rickshaw Tour

Discover Berlin’s past and present with the comfort and convenience of an e-rickshaw. Relax as your driver takes you past the main sights of central Berlin, making stops for photos or a famous Currywurst whenever you like. Drive around famous avenues such as Unter den Linden, see Cold War remnants at Checkpoint Charlie and go past historic Brandenburg Gate. See nightlife around Orienburger Str and lively Hackescher Markt, where the tour ends. Choose a 3-hour tour to visit the graffiti at East Side Gallery and Tiergarten. The e-rickshaw is protected from rain and sunshine - perfect for any time of year.

Berlin: Jewish History Walking Tour with Historian

4. Berlin: Jewish History Walking Tour with Historian

Although the Jewish experience in Berlin began in the 13th century, intolerance was so entrenched that it took hundreds of years, until 1714, before Berlin’s first synagogue was erected in Heidereutgasse. Your walk begins at the remaining foundations of the so-called Old Synagogue, where your guide, a Jewish Studies scholar, helps you to grasp the challenges faced by German Jews during the middle ages and renaissance and to appreciate the rich cultural life developed by Berlin’ s Jewish community in spite of their vulnerable status. The major focus, however, will be the main sites of Berlin’s 19th- and 20th-century Jewish history, the districts of Spandauer Vorstadt and Scheunenviertel (known as the 'Barn Quarter') in Berlin-Mitte. Taking in the graceful avenue, Oranienburger Straße, where the magnificent New Synagogue was erected in 1866, you learn not only of the conflicts between German Jews and Non-Jews but of tensions between the mostly assimilated German Jewry and the so-called Eastern Jews (Ostjuden) who filled Berlin in the 1920s after fleeing dramatic anti-Jewish violence in their homelands. Many of these refugees were orthodox and poor. They brought a completely new infrastructure for Jewish religious and cultural life to Berlin with them. Examining visual material such as photographs from Jewish street vendors and old newspapers, you consider how Jewish life in Berlin became far more visible in the 1920s. For precisely this reason, the established German Jewish community often regarded the influx of Eastern Jews as potentially dangerous for their own status within German society. One response was their support for institutions of social welfare and education. Stop at an example of this philanthropy, the former Jewish orphanage in Auguststraße, which today is home to an exhibit hall and a coffee shop. (If the current exhibition is dealing with a topic related to the tour, a visit of the exhibition should be taken into consideration.). The Jewish Cemetery on Große Hamburger Straße also gives a vivid impression of Berlin’ s Jewish presence. Assimilated Jews in Berlin played leading roles in every field of German culture: journalism, education, science, literature, art, music, business. During the short, anxious Weimar era (1919-1933), the great painter Max Liebermann created his works and became head of the Berlin Secessionists. Kurt Weill redefined musical theater. Walter Benjamin penned the whimsical academic essays that inaugurated a philosophy of modernity. Despite the prominence of such figures, anti-Semitic violence of a new degree broke out as early as November 1923. In front of the former Labor Office in Gormannstraße, talk about the so-called Scheunenviertel Pogrom. By 1933, the ‘ Barn Quarter’ became one of the first settings of the Nazis’ political purges in the capital city. You discuss the series of sinister events that lead to full implementation of Hitler’ s “Final Solution” in Berlin while visiting sites that recall the Holocaust, such as the Missing House graphic at Grosse Hamburger Strasse 15/16, which lists the names of former Jewish residents and the Abandoned Room at Koppenplatz, which memorializes the Jews taken on the November 1938 Kristallnacht, and some of the city’ s 1,400 Stolpersteine (stumbling cobblestones), reminders of the Shoah’ s victims. Before leaving the Barn Quarter, visit the kosher coffee shop Beth-Café to consider the renewal of Berlin’ s Jewish life today. The last stop is the New Synagogue, the architecture of which symbolized and celebrated Jewish assimilation in Germany. It is thus one of the most moving sites on your walk. Today it is home to the Jewish community reviving in Berlin, and moreover houses a gallery with changing exhibitions that you may wish to visit in conclusion.

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What people are saying about Scheunenviertel

Overall rating

4.8 / 5

based on 1,094 reviews

Great tour, highly recommended! Exploring Berlin by bike was a lot of fun, the time flew by and we got to learn a lot about the city! This was my third time in Berlin and still I got to enjoy places I did not see previously! Our guide was brilliant, I could not recommend this tour more! we will make sure to book another bike tour when we are next in Berlin!

An amazing tour! Nearly 4 hours in total but time flew as fast as our guide cycled! Our stops were fascinating and the history for each was impeccable and fascinating. A must for any visitor to Berlin!

It was a nice tour with a very informative tour guide. Bikes were good and comfortable. Route was great and got some super photos. Would definitely recommend tourists to do this tour.

Pete-our tour guide was phenomenal in terms of covering the must-see sights and covering the history. He is very knowledgeable, informative and interesting to listen to.

Peter was a great guide from Liverpool and was very informative but in a lighthearted, fun way.Easy cycle,safe roads,lots of stops and a coffee/toilet break.